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Turtle Time: Human Impact on their Ecosystem

Last changed: 06/13/2018 9:50pm
3 , 4 , 5
Theatre English Science
Grade Level Program Access
1 60 min
In-School Performance in-school performance (intended for individual classes of a grade level to experience separately)
Program can also be selected as a grade level performance.
All year
$10 0
no Email , Phone
Artist brings powerpoint slides on a thumbdrive to plug into the classroom system. Artist can also bring projector and laptop if not available in the classroom. Artist will bring paper copies (picture book format) of slides as back up. study guide; resource materials; props as needed for further discussion and demonstration
screen or blank wall for slide show; darkened room; computer, projector, and remote, if available - if not please inform artist who will bring necessary equipment; outlet; extension cord; photocopier for handouts; pencils; clipboards (if available) and lined paper; white board or chart paper
Screen or blank wall to project images onto. Classrooms to be darkened as much as possible or the darkest classroom selected for the program. Students can remain in seats or group on the "rug" in classrooms. A white board or chart paper will be used for student questions and observations. If clipboards available, students to use clipboard and pencil.
I can describe how artificial light at night confuses sea turtle hatchlings who expect the brightest light to be moonlight reflecting on the water.

I can describe how the performer used repetition to emphasize a point and engage the audience.
One Hundred Million Years of Turtle Time and Human Impact on their Ecosystem is a non-fiction and interactive storytelling performance that uses hand-drawn images and spoken word to describe how sea turtle behavior depends on the environmental cues of day and night and highlights how lighting technologies have changed turtle ecosystems. Students participate by joining in on repetitive phrases and hand-gestures during the performance. The story begins by defining night as a shadow, and explains why turtles lay their eggs at night. Students learn that new-born turtle hatchlings look for light reflected off the water to know “their way to their ocean home.” But when turtles confuse artificial light for moonlight on the water, they go the wrong direction and get lost. The performance ends with the upbeat message that as we modify our lighting technologies to protect the environment, turtle hatchlings will once again “find their way to their ocean home”.

Discussion and Q & A focus on how and why the performer uses artistic techniques such repetition. I also share the background of how and why I created this program, to share a personal concern about light pollution. Because I am an author/illustrator, I used my art forms of writing and making pictures to express my passion and my concern.

Grade Level Adaptations include
modifying vocabulary up and down for grade level; using additional visual aids as needed; and adapt the discussion to grade level science and performance standards and information about my research for the work.

Performance adaptations include stopping mid-stream for upper grades to brainstorm solutions before they are presented, or writing out the repetitions on a white board for younger learners.

This program demonstrates how an artist wrote, illustrated, and performs a non-fiction story to address real-life social and environmental concerns.

The format of this work can be used as a model for student non-fiction research and writing.

Volunteers can assist students with repetition at appropriate moments in the performance; volunteers can assist with Q &A as well as pass out paper and pencil when appropriate.

Grade 3

Grade 3: Science: Interdependent Relationships in Ecosystems: Construct an argument with evidence that in a particular habitat some organisms can survive well, some survive less well, and some cannot survive at all: Biodiversity and Humans: Populations live in a variety of habitats, and change in those habitats affects the organisms living there.
Grade 3: Speaking and Listening Standards: Comprehension and Collaboration #2: Determine the main ideas and supporting details of a text read aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally.
Grade 3: Theatre: Responding: Anchor Standard 7: Perceive and Analyze artistic work. A. Understand why artistic choices are made in a drama/theatre work.

Grade 4

Grade 4: Structure, Function, and Information Processing: Use a model to describe that animals receive different types of information through their senses, process the information in their brain,and respond to the information in different ways: Structure and Function: Plants and animals have both internal and external structures that serve various functions in growth, survival, behavior, and reproduction.
Grade 4: Speaking and Listening Standards: Comprehension and Collaboration #2: Paraphrase portions of a text read aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally.
Grade 4: Theatre: Responding: Anchor Standard 7: Perceive and Analyze artistic work. A. Identify artistic choices made in a drama/theatre work through participation and observation.

Grade 5

Grade 5: Earth's Systems: Obtain and combine information about ways individual communities use science ideas to protect the Earth's resources and environment: Human Impact on Earth Systems: Individuals and communities are doing things to help protect Earth's resources and environments.
Grade 5: Speaking and Listening Standards: Comprehension and Collaboration # 2: Summarize a written text read aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally.
Grade 5: Theatre: Responding: Anchor Standard 7: Perceive and Analyze artistic work. A. Explain personal reactions to artistic choices made in a drama/theatre work through participation and observation.
Get to Know Our Arts Provider:

Sanna Stanley

www.SannaStanley.com