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Designing a Fantasy Hideaway (elementary)

Last changed: 05/30/2019 12:39pm
4 , 5
Visual Art Science
Grade Level Program Alignment
1 120 min
120 minutes for each classroom
In-School Workshop - In-School Performance (intended for individual classes of a grade level to experience separately)
All year
$10 50
no Phone , Email
scaled site plan, markers, oaktag pieces cut to size, scissors,
(200) Built-It Discs (on loan for the workshop)
copies of student worksheets and rubric, pencils
2 activities occur and require different kinds of space. First part of workshop involves the Built-It Disc activity and requires space for teams of students (working 4 on a team) to create design solutions that they can actually fit in. Open space is required, 20'l x 20'w space (desks can be pushed to one side of room), hallway, library, or gym. Second activity involves students creating an individual Fantasy Hideaway at their own desk. Hopefully, the 2 spaces are near each other and time not lost traveling from one space to the other.
Grade 4
I can work collaboratively with a team to create life size 3-dimensional structures using corrugated cardboard discs. I can understand how to interpret a 2-dimensional scaled site plan. Using the same cut and slot method of construction, I can plan, design, and construct a Fantasy Hideaway, a 3-dimensional, smaller scale, make-believe structure, where I hang-out with my friends. I can determine the best location for my structure on the site plan to demonstrate my understanding of the relationship between the natural and built environments and I can describe my reasons for selecting its location.

Grades 5
I can work collaboratively with a team to create life size 3-dimensional structures, using corrugated cardboard discs. These structures solve specific design problems (tallest structure, longest span, etc) and address specific constraints and performance criteria. I can understand how to interpret a 2-dimensional scaled site plan. I can create a small scale model of a 3-dimensional structure using the cut and slot method of construction and corrugated cardboard that represents a place, a Hideaway, where I can hang-out with my friends. I can determine who will use my Hideaway: what kinds of activities we will do in the Hideaway; what kinds of rules I will have for its use and care; the materials it will be made out of; and, provide reasons where it will be located on a given site plan.
Working in teams of four and using die-cut 12” corrugated octagonal cardboard discs students will solve various design challenges. Together, they will experience first hand how to construct structures using the discs. Students learn about the material properties and construction methods for corrugated cardboard disc assembly and use the cut and slot method of construction. Students test the strength of the discs and experiment how to connect them to solve design problems. They will be given specific criteria and performance expectations for each challenge they must address with their team.

Using the “Build-It Discs”, structures will be constructed large enough for the teams to enclose themselves in; to see which team can construct the longest span; and, which team can build the tallest self-supporting tower. Solutions will be analyzed. What worked, what didn’t work and why will all be explored.

Upon completion of the team building challenges, students work individually at their desks to solve a structural design problem using similar materials but at a much smaller scale. The structure must be self-supporting. Each student will design a Fantasy Hideaway, a place where they can hang-out with their friends.

Oaktag pieces will be used to construct structures of their own design. Students will be responsible for cutting slots in the oaktag, connecting them, planning, designing and building their structures. A worksheet will lead students through the various steps that will need to be considered in the design process (define the problem, identify the criteria and constraints, brainstorm and analyze ideas, develop solutions/build a model, present ideas for feedback, redesign). Provided with a site plan, students determine where their structure will be located and give reasons for its location. They will describe the structure’s real building materials and colors; number of intended users; and, rules for its use and care.
NA
2 caregivers to assist with supplies

Grade 4

Science Grade 4.Earth’s Systems: Processes that Shape the Earth: 4-ESS2-2. Analyze and interpret data from maps to describe patterns of Earth’s features. DCI: The locations of mountain ranges, deep ocean trenches, ocean floor structures, earthquakes, and volcanoes occur in patterns. Most earthquakes and volcanoes occur in bands that are often along the boundaries between continents and oceans. Major mountain chains form inside continents or near their edges. Maps can help locate the different land and water features areas of Earth.
Science Grade 4: Engineering Design 3-5-ETS1-1: Define a simple design problem reflecting a need or a want that includes specified criteria for success and constraints on materials, time, or cost. DCI: Defining and Delimiting Engineering Problems Possible solutions to a problem are limited by available materials and resources (constraints). The success of a designed solution is determined by considering the desired features of a solution (criteria). Different proposals for solutions can be compared on the basis of how well each one meets the specified criteria for success or how well each takes the constraints into account. (3-5-ETS1-1)
Grade 4: Visual Art: Creating: Anchor Standard 1: generate and conceptualize artistic ideas and work. B. Collaboratively set goals and create artwork that is meaningful and has purpose to the maker.

Grade 5

Science Grade 5: Engineering Design 3-5-ETS1-1: Define a simple design problem reflecting a need or a want that includes specified criteria for success and constraints on materials, time, or cost. DCI: Defining and Delimiting Engineering Problems Possible solutions to a problem are limited by available materials and resources (constraints). The success of a designed solution is determined by considering the desired features of a solution (criteria). Different proposals for solutions can be compared on the basis of how well each one meets the specified criteria for success or how well each takes the constraints into account. (3-5-ETS1-1)
Grade 5: Visual Art: Creating: Anchor Standard 1: generate and conceptualize artistic ideas and work. B. Combine ideas to generate an innovative idea for art-making.