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Cinderella Stories: Estrellita D'Oro and Billy Beg (elementary)

Last changed: 05/29/2019 8:24am
PK , K , 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 Theatre
Theatre English
Both Grade Level and Arts/PE Program Access
1 60 min
1 60 min
In-School Performance In-School Performance (intended for the entire grade level to experience together)
All year.
$5 0
$250 0
no
We provide all the materials.
The puppet theater is 5 feet by 5 feet and 7 feet tall. It can be set up anywhere there is adequate room for the theater and seating for the audience. It works best if the students are in a room small enough to see the puppets, which are about the size of a small child (with the exception of the large dragon puppet.)
I can contribute to a performance by speaking, dancing, moving appropriately with prompting and supervision by an adult leader/performer.
I can create my own classroom assignments that demonstrate the differences between two different versions of the same story from different cultures, and the difference between a story in written form and as a performance.
A variety of muppet-style puppets and a narrator present the stories of Estrellita D'Oro or Little Golden Star, often called the Mexican Cinderella. Like Cinderella, with the help of magical animal friends she overcomes the cruel treatment of her stepmother and stepsisters to win the attention of the Prince, although in this case it is because she has a golden star on her forehead. This adaptation ends with Estrellita choosing college before marriage. Children participate by performing a dance led by the puppets and narrator and by providing voice acting as cued by the performers.
Billy Beg lives with his father the king and his stepmother and his best friend, a pet bull. When the stepmother objects to a bull in the castle, Billy and his friend leave and embark on a life of adventure. Eventually Billy takes a job as a shepherd, and uses his education and life experience to outwit some trolls and to tame a troublesome dragon. The children participate by performing as sheep and reacting at the instruction of the narrator. The program includes a study guide for teachers. The study guide includes story versions of both puppet shows in the performance. Students could read the stories or do other suggested assignments before or after the show, as the teacher deems appropriate. The narrator guides the students before and during the performance in proper theater behavior, such as remaining in your seat and being quiet unless directed otherwise, and applauding at the end. The talkback will focus on the elements of the stories, how they are similar and different, and how they fit within the genre of folktales and folklore. Children will be allowed to ask questions about writing and performing shows using puppets, to touch puppets and ask questions of the characters played by the puppets.
A variety of muppet-style puppets and a narrator present the stories of Estrellita D'Oro or Little Golden Star, often called the Mexican Cinderella. Like Cinderella, with the help of magical animal friends she overcomes the cruel treatment of her stepmother and stepsisters to win the attention of the Prince, although in this case it is because she has a golden star on her forehead. This adaptation ends with Estrellita choosing college before marriage. Children participate by performing a dance led by the puppets and narrator. During a brief break students are provided with sheep puppets and shown how to use them as part of the performance of Billy Beg and his Bull. Billy Beg lives with his father the king and his stepmother and his best friend, a pet bull. When the stepmother objects to a bull in the castle, Billy and his friend leave and embark on a life of adventure. Eventually Billy takes a job as a shepherd, and uses his education and life experience to outwit some trolls and to tame a troublesome dragon. The children participate by performing as sheep and reacting at the instruction of the narrator. The program includes a study guide for teachers. The study guide includes story versions of both puppet shows in the performance. Students could read the stories or do other suggested assignments before or after the show, as the teacher deems appropriate. The narrator guides the students before and during the performance in proper theater behavior, such as remaining in your seat and being quiet unless directed otherwise, and applauding at the end. The talkback will focus on the elements of the stories, how they are similar and different, and how they fit within the genre of folktales and folklore. Children and educators will be given the chance to ask questions about writing and performing shows using puppets, to touch puppets and ask questions of the characters played by the puppets. The study guide and talkback will vary, based on grade level and type of class. Generally younger students focus on the plot elements of the story while older students grasp deeper aspects of the show, such as positive and negative character traits and how they drive the narrative, and the use of different types of voices in puppetry performance.
This program is engaging for very young audiences, but older children also enjoy the program. Often second and third grade audiences engage in a deep level of discussion that relates to their curriculum goals.
Caregivers can and monitor the class during the performance and prompt the students discussion topics at the talk back, in order to correspond with classroom goals. There is no limit to the number of helpers but none are needed

Grade PK

PK:Reading: #30 Recognize there are different text structures, e.g., Once upon a time… beginnings — fairytales; Hickory, dickory, dock — nursery rhymes.
PK: Theatre: Responding: Anchor Standard 8a: With prompting and support, explore preferences in dramatic play, guided drama experience (e.g., process drama, story drama, creative drama), or age-appropriate theatre performance.
PK: Theatre: Responding: Anchor Standard 8b: With prompting and support, name and describe characters in dramatic play or a guided drama experience (e.g., process drama, story drama, creative drama).

Grade K

Grade K: Reading Standards for Literature: Integration of Knowledge and Ideas #9: With prompting and support, compare and contrast the adventures and experiences of characters in familiar stories.
K: Theatre: Responding: Anchor Standard 8a: With prompting and support, explore preferences in dramatic play, guided drama experience (e.g., process drama, story drama, creative drama), or age-appropriate theatre performance.
K: Theatre: Responding: Anchor Standard 8b: With prompting and support, name and describe settings in dramatic play or a guided drama experience (e.g., process drama, story drama, creative drama).

Grade 1

Grade 1: Reading Standards for Literature: Integration of Knowledge and Ideas #9. Compare and contrast the adventures and experiences of characters in stories.
Grade 1: Theatre: Responding: Anchor Standard 8a: Explain preferences and emotions in a guided drama experience (e.g., process drama, story drama, creative drama), or age-appropriate theatre performance.
Grade 1: Theatre: Responding: Anchor Standard 8b: Identify causes of character actions in a guided drama experience (e.g., process drama, story drama, or creative drama).

Grade 2

Grade 2: Reading Standards for Literature: Integration of Knowledge and Ideas #9. Compare and contrast two or more versions of the same story (e.g.) Cinderella Stories) by different authors or from different cultures.
Grade 2: Reading Standards for Literature: Key Ideas and Details #2: Recount stories, including fables and folktales from diverse cultures, and determine their central message, lesson or moral.
Grade 2: Theatre: Responding: Anchor Standard 7.1.2 a: Recognize when artistic choices are made in a guided drama experience (e.g., process drama, story drama, creative drama). "
Grade 2: Theatre: Performance: Anchor Standard 6.1.2 a: Contribute to group guided drama experiences (e.g.,process drama, story drama, creative drama) and informally share with peers. "

Grade 3

Grade 3: Reading Standards for Literature: Key Ideas and Details #9. Compare and contrast the most important points and key details presented in two texts on the same topic.
Grade 3: Theatre: Responding: Anchor Standard 8a: Consider multiple personal experiences when participating in or observing a drama/theatre work.
"Grade 3: Theatre: Responding: Anchor Standard 8b: Consider multiple ways to develop a character using physical characteristics and prop or costume design choices that reflect cultural perspectives in drama/theatre work. "

Grade 4

Grade 4: Reading Standards for Literature: Key Ideas and Details #2: Determine the main idea of a text and explain how it is supported by key details; summarize the text.
"Grade 4: Theatre: Responding: Anchor Standard 8a: Compare and contrast multiple personal experiences when participating in or observing a drama/theatre work.
Grade 4: Theatre: Responding: Anchor Standard 8b: Compare and contrast the qualities of characters in a drama/theatre work through physical characteristics and prop or costume design choices that reflect cultural perspectives."