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Professor Noodles McDoodles Creative Creatures

Last changed: 05/03/2018 10:43am
K , 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 , 5 Visual Art
Visual Art Science
Both Grade Level and Arts/PE Program Alignment
1 45 min
1 45 min
In-School Workshop Intended for an individual classroom as the students need a tabletop area to draw.
All year but prefer after November 1.
$10 0
$200 0
no Phone , Email , Other , In-Person
Artist will provide large drawing pad with easel and markers which will allow for his performance. Artist will also bring plain white paper 8.5x11 along with crayons for the students to use.
Teachers do not need to provide any supplies (Artist will provide all) however if able, teachers can supply standard 8.5x11 white paper with pencils, erasers and crayons (optional)
The artist needs a small area to set up easel (very mobile) possibly in front or side of room so all students can watch. Students should be at their desks or tables where they can also draw and be creative.
As a result of experiencing the "Professor Noodles McDoodles Creative Creatures", students will be inspired to state: I can learn about various animals, their history, evolution and characteristics that help them to survive and contribute to the cycle of life. I can be more creative by acquiring easily understood techniques that inspire me to create my own creatures and not imitate or duplicate creatures someone else produced. I can plan a drawing that incorporates certain elements and perform a challenge set by Professor Noodles McDoodles. Professor Noodles McDoodles Creative Creatures" is a 'sister' endeavor with creators of the TV Show "Yes I Can" with Crayon Man where the program title also reinforces the "I Can" mentality.
Professor Noodles McDoodles Creative Creatures is a 45 minute/1 class format which is consistent with all sessions. This allows teachers the ability to adequately prepare and set prior expectations with their students (i.e. get them excited!). A crayonimal is a fictitious creature that is created by combining the features of at least 3 different animals (e.g. the head of a giraffe on the body of a shark with the legs/tail of an elephant). The concept of a crayonimal is to (1) encourage observation and uniqueness of surroundings “in this case, what makes an animal visually distinct and why”, and (2) to promote originality and creative thinking. Many times youth draw commonly known characters like Mickey Mouse, Bart Simpson, SpongeBob, etc. and to imitate art is good because it is exercising the technical aspect of drawing…however, the true ability to create is to be original and not copy. Start: Professor Noodles McDoodles (PNM) enters and introduces himself and does a stretch exercise to loosen the hands/minds.• Students are asked to observe PNM draw and students identify animals and their characteristics (for example: Turtle/shell, Elephant/trunk, Shark/fin). PNM incorporates animal characteristics conveyed by students into a drawing. Creating a crayonimal and discussing the importance of observation and originality. • PNM discusses major animal groups and provides physical characteristics to identify them. The class volunteers 2 types of animals within 2 specified animal groups and PNM adds a 3rd ‘mystery’ animal and asks students to identify the animal. PNM instructs the students on artistic/drawing technique such as using the whole page to compose a drawing, using features for expression such as eyes and mouth, showing depth and 3-dimensionality with a creature and an overview of 1-point and 2-point perspective.• Group crayonimal drawing 1 – volunteers suggest 3 types of animals from specified groups. Entire class draws their own crayonimal incorporating the characteristics they feel are indicative of the animals targeted. • When complete, PNM shows class how he incorporated the 3 animal characteristics. Students are asked to hold up their drawings so the classroom can see how they individually incorporated the animal characteristics. Selected students volunteer to describe their drawings to the class. • Group crayonimal drawing 2 – A repeat of the prior drawing exercise is done to confirm teachings and experience another challenge using the learned techniques. • Selected students volunteer to describe their drawings to the class. • Recap-PNM recaps lessons learned with the foremost being originality, creative thinking, observation and solving challenges. The scientific standards “animal groups and their identifiable characteristics” AND the artistic standards learned are confirmed.
The program description remains the same for Grade level classrooms and Arts classrooms.
Professor Noodles McDoodles Creative Creatures is a 45 minute/1 class format which is consistent with all sessions. This allows teachers the ability to adequately prepare and set prior expectations with their students (i.e. get them excited!). A crayonimal is a fictitious creature that is created by combining the features of at least 3 different animals (e.g. the head of a giraffe on the body of a shark with the legs/tail of an elephant). The concept of a crayonimal is to (1) encourage observation and uniqueness of surroundings “in this case, what makes an animal visually distinct and why”, and (2) to promote originality and creative thinking. Many times youth draw commonly known characters like Mickey Mouse, Bart Simpson, SpongeBob, etc. and to imitate art is good because it is exercising the technical aspect of drawing…however, the true ability to create is to be original and not copy.
A Caregiver could assist Professor Noodles McDoodles with coordinating the materials (paper, crayons) and also being interactive with the students per to direction of the performer. Two Caregivers would be sufficient.

Grade K

Grade K: Science Standards K.Interdependent Relationships in Ecosystems: Animals, Plants, and Their Environment K-ESS2-2. Construct an argument supported by evidence for how plants and animals (including humans) can change the environment to meet their needs. [My program will discuss different animals and how their characteristics are related to their environments. Example: Elephant trunk and giraffe necks elongated to reach food source.]
Grade K: Science Standards K.Interdependent Relationships in Ecosystems: Animals, Plants, and Their Environment K-ESS3-3. Communicate solutions that will reduce the impact of humans on the land, water, air, and/or other living things in the local environment. [My program will discuss the importance of an animals habitat and keeping it natural so animals can thrive. Example: Turtles have shells to protect them. Some turtles live in swamps and the importance of preserving wetlands
Grade K: Visual Arts: Creating: Anchor Standard 1: Generate and conceptualize artistic ideas and work. a. Engage collaboratively in creative art-making in response to an artistic problem. (Program alignment: Students will be challenged to draw fictitious creatures and share with the class)
Grade K Visual Arts: Responding: Anchor Standard 7: Perceive and analyze artistic work a. Describe what an image represents. (Program alignment: Students share their creations and describe what areas of the drawings represent different creatures and the uses of these animal characteristics "ex. the ling nose/tongue of an aardvark so it can extract ants from an ant-mound")

Grade 1

Grade 1: Science Standards 1.Structure, Function, and Information Processing 1-LS1-1. Use materials to design a solution to a human problem by mimicking how plants and/or animals use their external parts to help them survive, grow, and meet their needs.* [In my program we will discuss animal characteristics and why they exist "food, shelter, protection, etc" and relate to humans. Example: Marsupials carry their young similar to how humans carry their young...food/protection, etc]
Grade 1: Science Standards 1.Structure, Function, and Information Processing 1-LS3-1. Make observations to construct an evidence-based account that young plants and animals are like, but not exactly like, their parents. [In my program will talk about animals and how they develop from babies to adults and the relationships. Example: a pollywog develops into a tadpole who develops into a frog with legs, etc]
Grade 1: Visual Arts: Responding: Anchor Standard 7: Perceive and analyze artistic work. a. Compare images that represent the same subject. (Program alignment: The class is given the same assignment/challenge and each student creates their own rendition of the desired features of an animal. Upon completion, students visually and verbally share/compare how they treated the same subject matter.
Grade 1: Visual Arts: Responding: Anchor Standard 8: Interpret intent and meaning in artistic work. a. Interpret art by categorizing subject matter and identifying the characteristics of form. (Program alignment: By categorizing animals into their groups (insect, mammal, reptile, fish, etc) and identifying common characteristics of these groups, the students are better able to present and critique classmates work and supply their insights into how peers incorporated features of various animals)

Grade 2

Grade 2: Science Standards 2.Interdependent Relationships in Ecosystems 2-LS2-2. Develop a simple model that mimics the function of an animal in dispersing seeds or pollinating plants. [In my program I will talk about how animals play a role in pollinating and spreading seeds such as birds eat seeds and spread the seeds in the droppings or bees pollinate vegetables which sustain life for others]
Grade 2: Science Standards 2.Interdependent Relationships in Ecosystems 2-LS4-1. Make observations of plants and animals to compare the diversity of life in different habitats. [In my program when discussing animal groups and their habitats a general observation will be made to convey common characteristics of animals to survive in their environment. Example: Husky dogs "and other cold weather animals" have thick fur/coats whereas as other dogs have short hair due to their origin habitats, etc]
Grade 2: Visual Arts: Creating: Anchor Standard 1: Generate and conceptualize artistic ideas and work. a. Brainstorm collaboratively multiple approaches to an art or design problem. (Program alignment: As a class, students are asked to consider and contribute sample features of various animal types and also explain the function of these animal features including how to incorporate these features into the creation/creature.)
Grade 2: Visual Arts: Creating: Anchor Standard 3: Refine and complete artistic work. a. Discuss and reflect with peers about choices made in creating artwork. (Program alignment: Students discuss how they chose to include certain features of certain animals into their original creature drawing.

Grade 3

Grade 3: Science Standards 3.Interdependent Relationships in Ecosystems 3-LS4-4. Make a claim about the merit of a solution to a problem caused when the environment changes and the types of plants and animals that live there may change. [In my program I will educate children on how animals adapt to their changing environment. Example: A Polar Bear has developed broad web-like feet because they ned to swim to help catch their food.]
Grade 3: Science Standards 3.Inheritance and Variation of Traits: Life Cycles and Traits 3-LS3-2. Use evidence to support the explanation that traits can be influenced by the environment. [My program will discuss different animals and how their characteristics are related to their environments. Example: Elephant trunk and giraffe necks elongated to reach food source.]
Grade 3: Visual Arts: Creating: Anchor Standard 1: Generate and conceptualize artistic ideas and work. a. Elaborate on an imaginative idea. (Program alignment: As students are asked to use their imagination to create fictitious creatures comprised of characteristics of commonly known animals, the students are asked to explain how they used their imagination to incorporate these creature features.
Grade 3: Visual Arts: Responding: Anchor Standard 9: Apply criteria to evaluate artistic work. a. Evaluate an artwork based on given criteria. (Program alignment: All students are given the same criteria or challenge to create artwork. Both at the onset, during the creation and upon completion the students share and evaluate artwork and how students differed in their treatment of the same criteria.)

Grade 4

Grade 4: Science Standards 4.Structure, Function, and Information Processing 4-LS1-1. Construct an argument that plants and animals have internal and external structures that function to support survival, growth, behavior, and reproduction. [In my program I'll talk about animal traits that are directly related to their existence. Example: a deer has horns during the mating season to use for protection or fighting for females...]
Grade 4: Science Standards 4.Structure, Function, and Information Processing 4-LS1-2. Use a model to describe that animals receive different types of information through their senses, process the information in their brain, and respond to the information in different ways. [In my program I will talk about animals senses and how they contribute to their survival. Example: Rabbit large ears for hearing or bats use echolocation senses for their prey, etc]
Grade 4: Visual Arts: Creating: Anchor Standard 1: Generate and conceptualize artistic ideas and work. a. Brainstorm multiple approaches to a creative art or design problem. (Program alignment: As a class, students are asked to brainstorm and contribute sample features of various animal types and also explain the function of these animal features including how to incorporate these features into the creation/creature.)
Grade 4: Visual Arts: Creating: Anchor Standard 3: Refine and complete artistic work. a. Revise artwork in progress on the basis of insights gained through peer discussion. (Program alignment: During a creative challenge, the facilitator (Professor Noodles McDoodles - PNM) roams the room and consults on the progress of the students creations. Periodically PNM will showcase a student drawing 'in-progress' and ask other students their opinion on the status and also ways other animal features can be incorporated.)

Grade 5

Grade 5: Science Standards 5.Matter and Energy in Organisms and Ecosystems 5-PS3-1. Use models to describe that energy in animals’ food (used for body repair, growth, motion, and to maintain body warmth) was once energy from the sun [In my program I will show/draw how certain animals use the sun for their survival/living. Example: Snakes bask in the sun to regulate body temperature]
Grade 5: Science Standards 5.Matter and Energy in Organisms and Ecosystems 5-LS2-1. Develop a model to describe the movement of matter among plants, animals, decomposers, and the environment. [In my program I will show/draw how animals have dependencies on other animals and the relationships of one animal to another. Example: Elephant dung is decomposed and used by Dung Beetles and as soil where plants grow and the growth of plants creates shelter, etc]
Grade 5: Visual Arts: Responding: Anchor Standard 7: Perceive and analyze artistic work: a. Compare one's own interpretation of a work of art with the interpretation of others. (Program alignment: Upon completion of a drawing challenge, the students compare their creations and how they each individually executed the same challenge)
Grade 5: Visual Arts: Responding: Anchor Standard 8: Interpret intent and meaning in artistic work. a. Interpret art by analyzing characteristics of form and structure, contextual information, subject matter, visual elements, and use of media to identify ideas and mood conveyed. (Program alignment: Using similar subject matter, visual elements and media, students are asked to use their own interpretations to create and then analyze each others creations)